Explaining Yugoslavia (Book, 2000) [WorldCat.org]
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Explaining Yugoslavia

Author: John B Allcock
Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, ©2000.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"In one of the most complete narratives on the subject, John B. Allcock traverses the politics, economics, demography, and culture of the former Yugoslavia, examining and making sense of the region's conflicted past and troubling present. Though many think of the Balkans as a uniquely volatile region, the author asserts that the continuities in Balkan history mirror the processes of development that have occurred in  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John B Allcock
ISBN: 0231120540 9780231120548 0231120559 9780231120555
OCLC Number: 42592868
Description: xxvii, 499 pages : maps ; 23 cm
Contents: Continuity and discontinuity --
The quest for understanding --
The argument outlined --
Balkan Societies in the Modern World --
Modernity: modernisation --
Globalisation --
The Balkans, Europe and the world --
Markets, Industry and Trade before 1945 --
Some preliminary framing generalisations --
The Ottoman Empire and the explanation of backwardness --
The development of Ottoman underdevelopment --
Regional diversity in the Ottoman economy in the Balkans --
The roots of backwardness in the Habsburg lands --
The "First Yugoslavia" and the problems of modernisation --
The economic impact of the Second World War --
The "Second Yugoslavia" and the Contradictions of Modernity --
Post-war socialist reorganisation --
The re-evaluation of central planning --
The development of "workers' self-management" --
The reform process and its contradictions --
Economic factors in the break-up of Yugoslavia --
Economic Modernisation: the Agrarian Economy --
Why agriculture? --
Modernisation, commoditisation and capitalism --
The agrarian economy in the Ottoman lands --
The agrarian economy in the Habsburg lands --
Agriculture in the "First Yugoslavia" --
The impact of the Second World War --
Agriculture under "administrative socialism" --
Reappraisal-and stagnation --
Agriculture and economic reform --
The "Green Plan" --
Agriculture in the years of crisis --
The Movement of Population: Territory and Power --
The importance of population --
Four types of population movement --
Conquest and the changing character of new elites --
War and the displacement of the defeated --
Spontaneous driftor "metanastasis" --
Modernisation and the flight to the towns --
Differential population growth --
New Classes for Old --
New perspectives for old --
Social hierarchy under the Habsburgs --
Social hierarchy under Ottoman absolutism --
The chimera of Balkan capitalism --
Inequality and Communist revolution --
The development of social differences in the "Second Yugoslavia" --
Inequalities as a factor in the break-up of Yugoslavia --
State Formation and the International Order --
States and the system of states --
"Imperial borderlands" and the "Eastern Question" --
The First World War and the formation of a unified South Slav state --
The "First Yugoslavia" in the Balkan political space --
The rise of socialist Yugoslavia and the Cold War --
The break-up of Yugoslavia in its global context --
Dimensions of Political Modernity: the Failure of Democracy --
"Democracy" and political modernity --
The importance of "civil society" ... --
... and the link with "citizenship" --
Representative institutions before unification of the South Slavs --
The populist pattern of interwar politics --
The political legacy of war: 1941-5 --
Communist hegemony and the one-party system --
Dimensions of Political Modernity: the Failure of Civil Society and Citizenship --
The underdevelopment of civil society before 1945 --
The failure of civil society in the Second Yugoslavia --
Citizenship --
Civility and "civil manners" --
The failure of citizenship and civil society --
The Forging of National Identity --
The construction of national identity --
The dialectics of national identity --
The nation as an "imagined community" --
Nationhood and the future of the South Slav peoples --
The Passing of Traditional Society? --
"Culture" and the nature of "tradition" --
Family life and kinship --
Land ownership --
Relationships of sponsorship and clientship --
Religion --
Politics as tradition --
Violence in South Slav Society --
Knowing the "other": the practice of knowledge --
Legitimacy, violence and social order --
The forms of legitimate violence --
The symbolic interpretation of violence --
Coda on "aberrant" violence --
Quo Vadis, Jugoslavijo? --
The place of the past: prison or patrimony? --
Why did Yugoslavia fall apart? --
Post-Communism in Yugoslavia: six theses.
Responsibility: John B. Allcock.

Abstract:

"In one of the most complete narratives on the subject, John B. Allcock traverses the politics, economics, demography, and culture of the former Yugoslavia, examining and making sense of the region's conflicted past and troubling present. Though many think of the Balkans as a uniquely volatile region, the author asserts that the continuities in Balkan history mirror the processes of development that have occurred in other societies and are part of the ongoing process of global modernization."--BOOK JACKET.

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Allcock fulfills the promise of his book's title in a way that will surprise most readers...The book's assertions will provoke controversy, but its breadth is unchallenged. Library Journal

 
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