Factors Influencing Human-Grizzly Bear Interactions in a Backcountry Setting (Article, 1980) [WorldCat.org]
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Factors Influencing Human-Grizzly Bear Interactions in a Backcountry Setting
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Factors Influencing Human-Grizzly Bear Interactions in a Backcountry Setting

Author: James M Chester
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Bears: Their Biology and Management, v4 (19800101): 351-357
Summary:
Interactions between humans and 7 species of wildlife, including grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis), were investigated in backcountry areas of the Gallatin Range, Yellowstone National Park, during the summers of 1973 and 1974. Grizzly bear distribution, movements, and behavior and human behavior were examined. Because grizzlies utilized areas with elevations much in excess of the study area's average trail  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: James M Chester
ISSN:1936-0614
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 5553074636
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Abstract:

Interactions between humans and 7 species of wildlife, including grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis), were investigated in backcountry areas of the Gallatin Range, Yellowstone National Park, during the summers of 1973 and 1974. Grizzly bear distribution, movements, and behavior and human behavior were examined. Because grizzlies utilized areas with elevations much in excess of the study area's average trail elevation, the likelihood of the off-trail party observing a grizzly bear was 3-4 times greater than that of a trail-traveling party. During the hiking season, grizzlies exhibited an elevational migration. The frequencies of on-trail and combined on- and off-trail observations and sign discoveries per party tended to peak during those periods that grizzlies were found at low elevations. Activity patterns of grizzlies at the point of first observation or after the bears had become aware of the human presence did not indicate behavioral traits likely to accentuate the possibilities of human-bear confrontations. Some backcountry travelers engaged in activities that could increase detrimental encounters with grizzly bears.

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