Monitoring post-tsunami vegetation recovery in Phang-Nga province, Thailand, based on IKONOS imagery and field investigations - a contribution to the analysis of tsunami vulnerability of coastal ecosystems (Article, 2012) [WorldCat.org]
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Monitoring post-tsunami vegetation recovery in Phang-Nga province, Thailand, based on IKONOS imagery and field investigations - a contribution to the analysis of tsunami vulnerability of coastal ecosystems
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Monitoring post-tsunami vegetation recovery in Phang-Nga province, Thailand, based on IKONOS imagery and field investigations - a contribution to the analysis of tsunami vulnerability of coastal ecosystems

Author: Hannes Römer; Jirapong Jeewarongkakul Affiliation: Wetlands International - Thailand office, Hat Yai, Thailand; Gunilla Kaiser Affiliation: Department of Geography, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany; Ralf Ludwig Affiliation: Department of Geography, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany; Horst Sterr Affiliation: Department of Geography, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:International Journal of Remote Sensing, v33 n10 (2012): 3090-3121
Summary:
A major tsunami in December 2004 devastated the coastal ecosystems along the Andaman Sea coast of Thailand. Since intact coastal ecosystems provide many important services for local communities at the Andaman Sea, it is crucial to investigate to what extent (in terms of percentage area and speed) the affected ecosystems were capable of recovering after the tsunami. Field measurements and multi-date IKONOS imagery  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Hannes Römer; Jirapong Jeewarongkakul Affiliation: Wetlands International - Thailand office, Hat Yai, Thailand; Gunilla Kaiser Affiliation: Department of Geography, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany; Ralf Ludwig Affiliation: Department of Geography, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany; Horst Sterr Affiliation: Department of Geography, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany
ISSN:0143-1161
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 4839366623
Awards:

Abstract:

A major tsunami in December 2004 devastated the coastal ecosystems along the Andaman Sea coast of Thailand. Since intact coastal ecosystems provide many important services for local communities at the Andaman Sea, it is crucial to investigate to what extent (in terms of percentage area and speed) the affected ecosystems were capable of recovering after the tsunami. Field measurements and multi-date IKONOS imagery were used to estimate the recovery and succession patterns of coastal vegetation types in the Phang-Nga province of Thailand, three years after the tsunami. Thus, this study contributes to a holistic understanding of the ecological vulnerability of the coastal area to tsunamis. A zone-based change detection approach is applied by comparing two change detection techniques: the first method involves the calculation of a recovery rate based on multi-temporal TNDVI (transformed normalized difference vegetation index) images (TNDVI approach), whereas the second approach is a combined approach of the change vector analysis (CVA). Although these two methods provide different types of information (quantitative for the TNDVI approach, qualitative for the CVA), they are comparable in terms of results and accuracies. The results reveal that recovery processes vary based on the type of the ecosystem and, furthermore, are strongly influenced by human activities. Grasslands, coconut plantations and the mixed vegetation cover could recover faster than the mangroves and casuarina forests. Among the forest ecosystems, recovery rates of casuarina forests were higher than for mangroves, but the recovery area was smaller. This study also discusses the potential and some limitations and inaccuracies of applying high-resolution optical imagery for assessing vegetation recovery at a local scale.

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