Policies designed for self-interested citizens may undermine "the moral sentiments": evidence from economic experiments. (Article, 2008) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
Policies designed for self-interested citizens may undermine
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Policies designed for self-interested citizens may undermine "the moral sentiments": evidence from economic experiments.

Author: S Bowles Affiliation: Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USA. samuel.bowles@gmail.com
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Science (New York, N.Y.) 2008 Jun 20; 320(5883): 1605-9
Other Databases: WorldCatWorldCatWorldCat
Summary:
High-performance organizations and economies work on the basis not only of material interests but also of Adam Smith's "moral sentiments." Well-designed laws and public policies can harness self-interest for the common good. However, incentives that appeal to self-interest may fail when they undermine the moral values that lead people to act altruistically or in other public-spirited ways. Behavioral experiments  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving;

Find a copy online

Links to this journal/publication

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: S Bowles Affiliation: Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USA. samuel.bowles@gmail.com
ISSN:0036-8075
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 264501062
Awards:

Abstract:

High-performance organizations and economies work on the basis not only of material interests but also of Adam Smith's "moral sentiments." Well-designed laws and public policies can harness self-interest for the common good. However, incentives that appeal to self-interest may fail when they undermine the moral values that lead people to act altruistically or in other public-spirited ways. Behavioral experiments reviewed here suggest that economic incentives may be counterproductive when they signal that selfishness is an appropriate response; constitute a learning environment through which over time people come to adopt more self-interested motivations; compromise the individual's sense of self-determination and thereby degrade intrinsic motivations; or convey a message of distrust, disrespect, and unfair intent. Many of these unintended effects of incentives occur because people act not only to acquire economic goods and services but also to constitute themselves as dignified, autonomous, and moral individuals. Good organizational and institutional design can channel the material interests for the achievement of social goals while also enhancing the contribution of the moral sentiments to the same ends.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.