Serious Games and Motor Learning (Article, 2013) [WorldCat.org]
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Serious Games and Motor Learning

Author: Josef Wiemeyer Affiliation: Technische Unversität Darmstadt, Germany; Sandro Hardy Affiliation: Technische Unversität Darmstadt, Germany
Edition/Format: Chapter Chapter : English
Summary:
Digital games in general require fine motor skills, i.e., operating the computer mouse, the keyboard, the touch-screen, or a joystick. With the development of new gaming interfaces, the performance of whole-body movements became possible to control a game. This opens up new lines of application, e.g. improving motor skills and motor abilities. The most important question is whether and how virtual game-based  Read more...
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Details

All Authors / Contributors: Josef Wiemeyer Affiliation: Technische Unversität Darmstadt, Germany; Sandro Hardy Affiliation: Technische Unversität Darmstadt, Germany
ISBN: 9781466636743
Publication:Serious Games and Virtual Worlds in Education, Professional Development, and Healthcare; ISR.gif; Chapter 13; p. 197-220
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 5007502069
Awards:

Abstract:

Digital games in general require fine motor skills, i.e., operating the computer mouse, the keyboard, the touch-screen, or a joystick. With the development of new gaming interfaces, the performance of whole-body movements became possible to control a game. This opens up new lines of application, e.g. improving motor skills and motor abilities. The most important question is whether and how virtual game-based perceptual-motor training transfers to real motor tasks. Theory distinguishes between specific motor skill learning and generic motor ability improvement. Existing evidence shows that the improvement of motor abilities (e.g., balance) is possible by particular exergames while the improvement of motor skills (e.g., basketball throw) depends on several moderators like accuracy of the interface and correspondence of virtual and real tasks. The authors conclude that there are two mechanisms of transfer, located at the elementary and fundamental perceptual-motor level and at the cognitive level. Current issues for technology comprise adaptivity, personalization, game mastering, accuracy of interfaces and sensors, activity recognition, and error detection.

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